New work by Jo Dunn

New work by Jo Dunn at the Bono Art Gallery

Preview – Saturday 13th September 6-9pm – all welcome

If you can’t make the preview, the exhibition runs from Saturday 13th – Tuesday 23rd September, 10am – 5pm (closed Sundays).

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Bio by David Veron on Jo Dunn

Having attended a foundation course in Liverpool, Jo Dunn moved to Leeds and completed a BA(Hons) in the early nineteen eighties. During her studies she discovered the work of abstract animators Len Lye, and Robert Breer, together with the acquisition of a 16mm rostrum movie camera, this led Jo into the field of animation, laboriously producing images frame by frame for short animated films running at twelve frames per second. By the end of the decade Jo was recognized as an animator of some distinction winning awards for her films at international competitions, working for Yorkshire TV, and collaborating with other film-makers.

Despite her success as an animator, Jo never abandoned painting, working on abstract compositions and landscapes in both oil and watercolour. This exhibition incorporates work from four decades and illustrates a consistent and thoughtful approach to both her subject and use of media.

I first met Jo at the opening of an exhibition at the Bono Art Gallery in early 2013, where we chatted about painting and she kindly gave me a postcard of her work. We subsequently met on numerous occasions and a mutual respect for each others working practice grew from there.

My utter admiration for the work that Jo produces derives from my understanding of the painting process through the eyes of a practitioner. As I work in oils I am able to explore ideas in the early stages of a painting making changes as I go along, scraping back areas I am dissatisfied with and editing the image to suit my developing message. This process is similar to that of a film-maker shooting and re-shooting footage until the aim is met. In Jo’s work there is no margin for error. The marks she produces are spontaneous and indelible. While one mark may effect the look of another by sharing the same space within the composition, the fact that one brush stroke preceded another means that a history of the artists hand across the space is forever frozen in time. As I drew the comparison of working in opaque layers of oil to the editing process of a film maker, so too can we draw the comparison of Jo’s process, laid bare, to that of a live performance, a ballet across a white rectangle. One error and the performance is forever destroyed.

Recent work has seen Jo returning to oil paint in a way that capitalizes on the development of this sense of immediacy in her water-colours. Using a gesso paste as a ground to prime the paper, Jo allows ridges to appear on the surface. Then using oil pigment diluted with large amounts of turps Jo reinvents the effect of water-colours with the added history of the priming process The effect of these processes allows the viewer a penetrating incite into the way in which each image is made.

Working with a Japanese calligrapher, Jo has been exploring work in ink on rice paper, and learning the traditional and methodical process of making a mark in a zen like way. To do this Jo describes a ritual of emptying her head of all thoughts before committing each mark to the page. It is the commitment to these practices that makes Jo Dunn one of the most interesting artists it has been my pleasure to know. Her work is insightful and thought provoking, energy filled while calm, colourful while muted, and beyond all else it is beautiful and timeless.

David Veron.

14 Artists at the Bono Art Gallery

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14 Artists at the Bono Art Gallery : David Brightmore – Joan Dunn – Michael John Griffiths – Gordon Bentley – Shane Green – David Veron – Laurence Pusey – Gorima Besu – Gillian Holding – Moff Skellington – German … Continue reading

One night only brush making demo

FREE PRIZE DRAW
WIN £45 OF BRUSHES ON THE NIGHT
Tuesday 18th March 7.00pm
At The Bono Art Gallery. Courthouse St, Otley.

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Symi Jackson, daughter of Rosemary of Rosemary & Co, will be demonstrating their range of hand made brushes, advising on selecting the correct brush, appropriate techniques, and caring for brushes. Symi will also demonstrate the traditional methods used in brush manufacture, and you may get the chance to try your hand at making a brush for yourself!

Entry is free to this enlightening evening for art practitioners, refreshments are on offer, and there will be a discount on gallery prices for the event.
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Generative Multimedia Art Performace

Proffessor Yiannis Papadopoulus, Roberto Bono and Alejandro Lopez Rincon Present an exploration of their work in the field of generative art.
Saturday 1st March, 2014, 8.00pm
@ The Bono Art Gallery 7a Courthouse Street, Otley. LS21 3AN

A unique exhibition mixing science, math, medicine with painting and music generated by a live heart can be seen for one night only. 

Its rare appearance in Otley next month is due to the collaboration of gallery owner Roberto Bono in the study led by Professor Yiannis Papadopoulos from the Department of Computer Science, University of Hull.

Sicilian born Bono is an abstract painter who experiments with double-sided paintings and panels that can be joined together in different ways creating a three dimensional space that crosses the boundary between painting and sculpture.  Roberto has created 12 double sided abstract panels for this study that can be flipped, rotated and positioned to make ‘quintillions’ of combinations.

Professor Papadopoulos has imagined these paintings as points in a vast artistic landscape, like wild flowers in a Mediterranean field in the spring. Roberto’s paintings are bright and colourful and so the metaphor of the flower meadow was effortlessly evoked and worked well as a concept to inspire this art project.

On March 1st Roberto will give a live demonstration of his work whilst Professor Papadopoulos discusses the concepts and philosophies underpinning this novel artistic concept and its future expansion with potential applications on art therapy, novel musical instrumentation and educational games.

“We like to think that there is both artistic merit and potentially useful practical applications in this project,” says Roberto.  “For example, informal feedback by clinicians who have experienced this artwork, and also from patients who have seen this in public presentations, suggests that it can have a therapeutic effect on people with long term conditions such as autism, tinnitus and dementia. We are currently planning research together with clinicians to test this hypothesis.”

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“West” Visual artwork by Roberto Bono, “Porta Ossuna” – Music by Andrea Alberti
You can click on the above image to experience the project for yourself.

 It requires a Microsoft Silverlight plugin and you will be prompted to install it if you haven’t already.

The live demonstration will be followed by a performance from Mexican Artist and study collaborator Alejandro Lopez Rincon who will generate images around the gallery by mixing the signals from his heart with electromagnetic noise and the sound of the room itself.

“There was this beautiful being, I fell in love with, and I just wanted to show her how she made me feel. Therefore, I built a device to measure my heart transform signals from the environment into images, to capture the moments, make the invisible visible. Please join me at the Bono Art Gallery, and help me create beautiful images.

Alejandro
Alejandro Lopez Rincon, Image  generate by mixing the signals from his heart. This image is the phrase “te amo” (click the image to enlarge)

What do I do? I generate images by mixing the signals from my heart, the electromagnetic noise, and the sound of the room. Is a way in which everyone in the room is connected to me, and together we make images. Then, I introduced some coefficients from their spectrum into the Fibonacci spiral. Why the Fibonacci Spiral?, because it is a model present in so many things in nature.

Alejandro Lopez Rincon

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The Computer Science department at University of Hull is planning a portfolio of conceptual art, starting with this series of musical painting sculptures that can be virtualised and enhanced with technologies to create interesting art works which, beyond their artistic merit, can also provide case studies for art therapy.

Hull Royal Infirmary has confirmed that it will be displaying Roberto’s three dimensional panels created for this study in its new refurbished patient unit later this year. ENDS

Roberto Bono: The Artist and chess player, Roberto Bono, left Sicily in 1982 to live and work in Iceland, Glasgow, Edinburgh and London before settling in Otley with his family in 2005. Since which he has continued to grow an international community of artists and creative thinkers through his website arteutile.net, eventually opening the Bono Art Gallery in 2012 showcasing the work of a diverse range of local and international artists and offering work spaces to artists of all mediums.

Roberto’s recent collaboration with Professor Yiannis Papadopoulos and a small group of mathematicians and musicians has been a natural evolution for his work, stretching the possibilities of the aesthetic into new realms.

The mind boggling number of combinations created by his generative art collaborations are paradoxically reflective on the human activity of painting. To watch a projection of Roberto’s panels being rearranged by a machine which each time evaluates the subsequent composition for aesthetic merit, allows the viewer an insight into the compositional dialogue between a painter and his work.

What is Generative Art?  http://generative.net/read/definitions

Generative art is a term given to work which stems from concentrating on the processes involved in producing an artwork, usually (although not strictly) automated by the use of a machine or computer, or by using mathematic or pragmatic instructions to define the rules by which such artworks are executed.

Generative art refers to any art practice where the artist creates a process, such as a set of natural language rules, a computer program, a machine, or other procedural invention, which is then set into motion with some degree of autonomy contributing to or resulting in a completed work of art.

The Computer Science Department at University of Hull has a strong track record in technologies that can support this type of research: software engineering, graphics, games and artificial intelligence.

Specifically, computer scientists have been employing these technologies in collaboration with painters and musicians on projects in the field of generative art.  Results of this work include the conceptual art work which presently gains international recognition and a paper on this work entitled “An evolving Musical Painting on The Boundary between Permanence and Change”

More info @ http://generativeart.net.dcs.hull.ac.uk/

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Generative Multimedia Art Performace

Proffessor Yiannis Papadopoulus, Roberto Bono and Alejandro Lopez Rincon Present an exploration of their work in the field of generative art, on Saturday 1st March 2014, at The Bono Art Gallery 7a Courthouse Street, Otley. LS21 3AN

Professor Yiannis Papadopoulos will give a short talk on an “Evolving musical painting on the boundary between permanence and change” an artistic concept that he developed together with painter Roberto Bono and musicians Andrea Alberti and Bob Salmieri.

He will give a live demonstration of the work and  discuss the conceptual and philosophical underpinnings of this novel artistic concept and its future expansion with potential applications on art therapy, novel musical instrumentation, and educational games. This work has recently been presented at the XVI International Generative Art Conference and has been exhibited in La Triennale di Milano the major contemporary design museum in Italy.”

Roberto Bono is an abstract painter who experiments with double-sided paintings and panels that can be joined together in different ways, creating a three dimensional space that crosses the boundary between painting and sculpture.

Professor Yiannis Papadopoulos imagined these many potential paintings as points in a vast artistic landscape, like wild flowers in a Mediterranean field in the spring. Roberto’s paintings are bright and colourful, and so the metaphor of the flower meadow was effortlessly evoked and worked well as a concept to inspire this art project.

There is a pervasive feeling of “everything changes and everything stays the same” in the experience of this art. Indeed, this work can be seen as an experiment on the edge between movement and stillness, stability and instability, permanence and change. This is a boundary that is both intriguing and fascinating, and one that has been the subject of deeply significant philosophical and artistic work in the past.

We like to think that there is both artistic merit and potentially useful practical applications in this project. For example, informal feedback by clinicians who have experienced this artwork — and also from patients who have seen this in public presentations — suggests that it can have a therapeutic effect, e.g. on people with long term conditions like autism, tinnitus, or dementia. We are currently planning research together with clinicians to test this hypothesis.

art2
“West” Visual artwork by Roberto Bono, “Porta Ossuna” – Music by Andrea Alberti
You can click on the above image to experience the project for yourself. It requires a Microsoft Silverlight plugin and you will be prompted to install it if you haven’t already.

The live demonstration will be followed by an Art performance by a Mexican Artist, Alejandro Lopez Rincon, that will generate images by mixing the signals from his heart, the electromagnetic noise, and the sound of the room.

“There was this beautiful being, I fell in love with, and I just wanted to show her how she made me feel. Therefore, I built a device to measure my heart transform signals from the environment into images, to capture the moments, make the invisible visible. Please join me at the Bono Art Gallery, and help me create beautiful images.

Alejandro
Alejandro Lopez Rincon, Image  generate by mixing the signals from his heart. This image is the phrase “te amo”

What do I do? I generate images by mixing the signals from my heart, the electromagnetic noise, and the sound of the room. Is a way in which everyone in the room is connected to me, and together we make images. Then, I introduced some coefficients from their spectrum into the Fibonacci spiral. Why the Fibonacci Spiral?, because it is a model present in so many things in nature.

Alejandro Lopez Rincon

 To keep updated please visit and like our facebook page  facebook

Chess Club with Tuition

This is an exciting new project here in Otley to encourage children and adults to start playing chess with expert tuition. Not only beginners are welcome but also players of all abilities. The game of chess is not known as the ” game for k…ings” for nothing. It’s benefits are widely known: it raises your IQ, it helps prevent Alzheimer’s, exercises both parts of the brain, increases your creativity, improves your memory, increases problem-solving skills, improves reading skills and concentration, it grows dendrites (check that one out!) and teaches planning and foresight.
Starts Wednesday 15th January – come and join us so we can get to know you. Let’s find the next grandmaster!

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